Field and Staff Officers

Colonel William H. Noble

Colonel William H. Noble

Colonel of the Seventeenth from its formation until its muster-out, Colonel Noble was wounded at Chancellorsville leading his regiment. He was captured on December 24, 1864 near the St. John's River in Florida. Ultimately sent to Andersonville Prison, he was the highest ranking officer ever imprisoned there. After the war Noble and his daughter made a very comfortable living handling pension claims for Union veterans.
(photo from Roger D. Hunt Collection/USAMHI)

Lt-Colonel Charles Walter

Lt-Colonel Charles Walter

Lt. Colonel Walter, born in Denmark, had been captured at 1st Bull Run. He was released in summer of 1862, and immediately joined the 17th as Lt. Colonel. He was known for his soft spoken mannerisms while drilling the regiment. Walter was killed at Chancellorsville at the Talley house in his first battle with the Seventeenth; the 1st of three Lt. Colonel's to die in action with the regiment.

From Cofut and Morris's "The Military and Civil History of Connecticut during the War of 1861-1865":

Lieut.-Col. Charles Walter was born in Copenhagen, Den
mark, in 1832, and came to America when young. He was
a private in Capt. Speidal s company, in the First Regiment ;
was promoted to be first lieutenant; and was aide on Gen.
Tyler s staff at the battle of Bull Run. On account of his
daring, he fell into the hands of the enemy, and spent a year in
rebel prisons. On returning, he was made lieutenant-colonel
of the Seventeenth. He was a man of education, of untiring
energy, and great bravery. He showed singular coolness
and resoluteness in battle; and his brother-officers said, "With
deep sorrow and regret we have left him behind, in ground
which needs no holier consecration than to entomb the re
mains of such a noble patriot." He was an admirable com
panion, possessing high social qualities, fine literary taste and
culture, and excellent musical attainments. He was also
something of a genius as an amateur artist, and made a
striking sketch of the rebel prison, afterwards lithographed
by his friends.

(photo courtesy of C. Paul Loane)

Lt-Colonel Douglass Fowler

Lt-Colonel Douglass Fowler

Another veteran of the three months service, Fowler was mustered in as Captain of Company A. Too sick to walk, he went with his company to Chancellorsville in an ambulance. Fowler, along with C. Frederick Betts, rallied large numbers of the 17th after they were driven from their position at Chancellorsville, and he was promoted to Lt. Colonel soon after. In command of the regiment at Gettysburg, he was killed on July 1st by artillery fire. His body was never recovered.

(photo courtesy of Bobby Dobbins)

Lt - Colonel Albert Wilcoxson

Lt - Colonel Albert Wilcoxson

Promoted to Lt. Colonel after the death of Douglas Fowler at Gettysburg, Wilcoxson was wounded at the skirmish at Braddock's Farm in 1865. He was taken prisoner but died of his wounds as a POW. His sword was returned to his widow in CT after his death by Captain J.J. Dickison, a fellow Mason. The sword is still in the possession Wilcoxson's lodge in CT. His body was returned to CT for burial in Norwalk.

(Photo courtesy of Matthew Morris)

Lt-Colonel Henry Allen

Lt-Colonel Henry Allen

Last Lt. Colonel of the 17th, Henry Allen first enlisted in the 71st New York Volunteer Infantry (3 months regiment) in 1861. One year after he was mustered out he returned home to Norwalk, CT and helped to recruit a company for the 17th,mustering in as 1st LT of Company F at the age of 20. He was wounded at Gettysburg, and became the last Lt. Colonel of the regiment after Lt. Col. Wilcoxson's death in Florida. Allen's younger brother died in 1864 of wounds suffered at Bermuda Hundred.

(photo courtesy of Bobby Dobbins)

Major Allen Brady

Major Allen Brady

A veteran of the 3 months service (where he was under arrest for insubordination for much of that time), Major Brady ended up in command of the regiment at both Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. He was wounded at the latter, and subsequently served as the Provost Marshal at Point Lookout POW Camp.

(From the collection of Dale Call)

Major Allen G. Brady (postwar)

Major Allen G. Brady (postwar)

Adjutant H Whitney Chatfield

Adjutant H Whitney Chatfield

Chatfield was conspicuous at Chancellorsville, where he helped to rally the remnants of his regiment. Promoted to Adjutant, Chatfield was killed at Dunn's Lake, Florida on February 5, 1865 as he tried to fight his way out of a Confederate ambush. His grief stricken parents brought his body home for burial in Bridgeport.

(from The Military and Civil History of CT during the War of 1861-1865)

Quartermaster Hanford Hayes

Quartermaster Hanford Hayes

1st Quartermaster of the 17th, he was court-martialed in 1863. His reputation ruined, he resigned his commission in July 1863.

(photo courtesy of Jeff Grzelak)

Surgeon Robert Hubbard

Surgeon Robert Hubbard

1st Surgeon of the 17th Connecticut. Hubbard was appointed Medical Director of the XI Corps prior to the Battle of Chancellorsville, and accompanied the XI and XII Corps when they were transferred to the west after Gettysburg. He resigned his position in late 1863.

(USAMHI)

Chaplain William Hall

Chaplain William Hall

1st chaplain of the 17th CVI

(photo courtesy of Bobby Dobbins)

Principal Musician John P. Hearn

Principal Musician John P. Hearn

Thomas and John Hearn enlisted in Company F as musicians - Thomas in August 1862 and John in February 1863 (although John's pension file claimed an August 1862 enlistment date). A third brother, James, enlisted in Company I and died of typhoid fever in April 1863. Thomas and John were originally musicians in Company F. Thomas was promoted to Principal Musician on July 1, 1863 and John on November 10, 1863. John Hearn was captured on February 4, 1865 at Dunn's Lake, Florida. He was imprisoned at Andersonville and was paroled on April 21, 1865. Both brothers were mustered out on July 19, 1865.

(photo courtesy of Kathleen McGarry)

Principal Musician Thomas R. Hearn

Principal Musician Thomas R. Hearn

Thomas and John Hearn enlisted in Company F as musicians - Thomas in August 1862 and John in February 1863 (although John's pension file claimed an August 1862 enlistment date). A third brother, James, enlisted in Company I and died of typhoid fever in April 1863. Thomas and John were originally musicians in Company F. Thomas was promoted to Principal Musician on July 1, 1863 and John on November 10, 1863. John Hearn was captured on February 4, 1865 at Dunn's Lake, Florida. He was imprisoned at Andersonville and was paroled on April 21, 1865. Both brothers were mustered out on July 19, 1865.

(photo courtesy of Kathleen McGarry)

Colonel William H. NobleLt-Colonel Charles WalterLt-Colonel Douglass FowlerLt - Colonel Albert WilcoxsonLt-Colonel Henry AllenMajor Allen BradyMajor Allen G. Brady (postwar)Adjutant H Whitney ChatfieldQuartermaster Hanford HayesSurgeon Robert HubbardChaplain William HallPrincipal Musician John P. HearnPrincipal Musician Thomas R. Hearn